A Japanese man has dedicated his spare time into creating a Twitter account that shows how timber joints slot together. The Twitter account is the complete 3D guide to Japanese wooden joinery styles. The account is called The Joinery and is made up of over 80 gifs, and has attracted over 20,000 followers since its creation. Its creator has a day job in the car industry but is an avid collector of woodwork books. All the gifs display Japanese joinery styles which don’t require the use of glue, nails or screws.

Finding the complex instructions hard to visualise, he set about creating a set of gifs that illustrate the different ways that pieces of wood can be bonded together.

“I was fascinated by the traditional techniques of creating strong bonds without the use of nails or adhesive,” he told Japanese design blog Spoon & Tamago. “I want to organise all the joinery techniques and create a catalogue of them all.”

The gifs are created using Autodesk’s Fusion 360 software, which can be used for modelling, animation and simulation.Fusion 360 is a cloud-based 3D CAD, CAM, and CAE platform for product development. It combines industrial and mechanical design, simulation, collaboration, and machining in a single package. The tools in Fusion 360 enable fast and easy exploration of

Fusion 360 is a cloud-based 3D CAD, CAM, and CAE platform for product development. It combines industrial and mechanical design, simulation, collaboration, and machining in a single package. The tools in Fusion 360 enable fast and easy exploration of design idea.The woodwork techniques documented can be used to create anything from furniture to house frames. With the prevalence of power tools, most of these techniques have now been largely forgotten.

The woodwork techniques documented can be used to create anything from furniture to house frames. With the prevalence of power tools, most of these techniques have now been largely forgotten.

Could Japanese joinery be making a comeback?

But The Joinery’s creator said digital fabrication and robotic construction offer an unlikely lifeline for old-fashioned carpentry techniques. He said:

“3D printing and woodworking machinery has enabled us to create complicated forms fairly easily.”

London’s Architecture Association school has recently launched a specialist robotics course, which has a focus on timber construction.

Programme director Martin Self had this to say about the importance of robotics in architecture.

“We are making robotics core to the research we do here, and believe there is particular potential in the application of natural forms in architecture, especially in combination with 3D-scanning technologies.”

French polishing for all your wood

For more information about our services, please contact us today to speak to one of our professional French polishers on 01827 874 535. Alternatively, fill in our contact form, or email Terry Waters French Polishing and we’ll get right back to you.

For all our latest news Follow TWFP on Twitter